Why parents don’t trust the school system

 

QUEENSLAND parents have the least faith in the education system in the country, and nearly half feel ill-equipped to support their child's education, new research reveals.

Research from Cluey Learning showed 93 per cent of Queensland parents surveyed thought the nation's schooling was poor or had room for improvement.

And overall 90 per cent of Australian parents have lost faith in the education system, with 80 per cent believing their child would be impacted negatively by schooling.

Nearly a quarter of Queensland parents thought their child would be negatively impacted by schooling, the third-highest proportion behind NSW/ACT and WA.

Queensland parents also felt the least equipped to support their child's learning, with 43 per cent worried they didn't have what it took to help their kids learn over the next decade.

Cluey Learning chief learning officer Dr Selina Samuels said the national research showed a concerning level of dissatisfaction with education system, with schools not adapting to make students feel prepared for an "uncertain future".

She said more than 60 per cent of senior students reported schools weren't doing enough to prepare them for the jobs of the future and more than 70 per cent believed they didn't address the unpredictable job market.

"Parents and students don't feel the schooling system is equipping them with the skills they need for the future," she said.

"Parents are prepared to find other ways to supplement their children's education, one of the things the survey shows is parents really want more feedback about how their children are progressing."

Shweta and Cameron Foulger chose to send their kids Ashish and Indra to Brisbane Montessori School because of their alternative approach to education. Picture: Annette Dew
Shweta and Cameron Foulger chose to send their kids Ashish and Indra to Brisbane Montessori School because of their alternative approach to education. Picture: Annette Dew

Brisbane mother-of-two Shweta Foulger said they chose to send their kids to Brisbane Montessori School because they "fell in love with the philosophy" of all-round development.

"One of the things we love is the multi-age classrooms, I love how the children have to work with different age groups in the same space and the practical life-skills they learn," she said.

Ms Foulger said they appreciated how important the schools' focus on developing practical skills and hands-on learning was to their children.

"They have to make market stalls once a term that they have to get approval for, pay rent for, and create a product that sells," she said.

"So it's not just independence, it's also interdependence we're teaching them - if someone in the team doesn't pull their weight, then everyone learns from it - so there's this community-building."


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