UV light may get tan fans hooked

THE sun - or at least its ultraviolet light - may be physically addictive, new research from the United States indicates.

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital conducted experiments on mice which showed them becoming addicted to UV light, the ABC's World Today reported.

It also showed the lab animals displaying physical signs of withdrawal when they were denied access to UV rays.

The research is particularly significant in Australia, which has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world.

Experts said the research also had ramifications for how the SunSmart message was delivered in Australia.

Department of Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr David Fisher, who led the study, said the research indicated that frequent tanners could develop an addiction to ultra violet radiation.

Cancer Council Australia's Craig Sinclair told the ABC that the research reinforced the wisdom of Australia's nation-wide decision to phase out and ban the tanning bed industry.

Are you addicted to a regular dose of UV rays?

This poll ended on 21 June 2015.

Current Results

You bet! I worship the sun every day.


I don't mind a bit of UV in moderation.


I'm a freckled ranga - what do you think?


My friends and I only come out at night.


This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

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