Turnbull says #Brexit is reason to "stick with this mob"

Mary Turner - Pool via AP

THE United Kingdom's exit from the European Union has been touted as evidence Australia should "stick with this mob" for a while longer.

While the much-ridiculed punchline of the Not-So-Fake Tradie advertisement was not explicitly uttered, the tenor was the same at the Liberal Party's launch in Sydney today.

"The shockwaves in the past 48 hours from Britain's vote to exit the European Union are a sharp reminder of the volatility in the global economy," Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the sympathetic crowd.

"Always expect the unexpected.

"We will need to renegotiate vital trade deals with Europe and Britain.

"We concluded five in the last three years - Japan, Korea, China, Singapore and the Trans Pacific Partnership.

"In six years Labor concluded none."

The prime minister stuck to his market-tested themes in his address to the party launch - stay tough on illegal immigration, strict on spending and optimistic about the ability of small business to innovate and build the economy.

More than once, he used the European Union split to prove economic austerity was needed.

"Our clear economic plan is more essential than ever as we enter a period of uncertainty in global markets following the British vote to leave the European Union," he said.

"Great opportunities are accompanied by great challenges.

"The upheaval reminds us there are many things in the global economy over which we have no control.

"Calm heads, steady hands, stable government and a strong economic plan are critical for Australia to withstand any repercussions.

"At a time of uncertainty, the last thing we need is a Parliament in disarray."

Mr Turnbull said Australia had weathered global shocks before, and weathered them well.

"Despite the greatest terms of trade shock in our history, with the fall in global commodity prices since the peak of the mining boom; in the year to March we are growing faster than any of the G7 economies and well above the OECD average," he said.

"In the last calendar year, there were 300,000 new jobs."

The crowd was treated to an video tribute to Mr Turbull's father, first released at the start of June.

"We didn't have much money; he was a hotel broker and for most of that time he was struggling," Mr Turnbull said on the video.

"He did well after a while. In the latter part of his life, he kicked a few goals after a lot of effort.

"I was the main object of everything he wanted to achieve.

"He was very focused on what was right for me.

"So when my mother left us, he always spoke about her in the most glowing terms.

"He talked her up, told her how much she loved me.

"He did everything he could to make sure we had the closest relationship.

"I didn't feel like I missed out on anything, because I had a lot of love, a father who never left me in any doubt that he loved me more than anything, anything on earth."

Topics:  brexit federal election 2016 liberal party malcolm turnbull

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