INVESTIGATION: The Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol is investigating after a hammerhead shark was found washed up on the beach near Urangan Pier. It is believed the shark’s fins and part of its lower jaw was removed.
INVESTIGATION: The Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol is investigating after a hammerhead shark was found washed up on the beach near Urangan Pier. It is believed the shark’s fins and part of its lower jaw was removed. Contributed

Hammerhead shark washes up on Urangan beach

AUTHORITIES are investigating after the body of a hammerhead shark, believed to have had its fins and a part of its lower jaw removed, washed up on the beach near Urangan Pier.

"The practice of finning sharks and dumping their bodies at sea is illegal in Queensland and penalties in excess of $100,000 can be imposed," a spokesman from Fisheries Queensland said.

The report comes just weeks after a Bundaberg woman claimed she stumbled upon the carcasses of about a dozen sharks with their fins removed while walking her dogs at at Elliott Heads beach.

"Anyone taking a shark fin must also retain the body of the shark whilst at sea," the spokesman said.

"These rules are in place as a deterrent to targeting these animals for their fins alone.

"Recreational fishers in Queensland are also subject to a maximum size limit of 1.5 metres as well as a possession limit of one shark per person.

"The exceptions are great white sharks, grey nurse sharks, sawfish and speartooth sharks which are no take.

"These rules are designed to provide protection to breeding adults and discourage any potential for black marketing of shark and their fins."


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