Menu
News

Service preparing farm-ready workers for the Lockyer

READY TO GO: Lockyer Valley Growers president Michael Sippel, QAWN project manager and agriculture workforce officer for Southern Queensland Karen George, Growcom CEO Pat Hannan, FarmReady  founder and director Janne Dipple and Lockyer Valley Alliance founding chair Keith Jackwitz at the launch of the FarmReady HUB.
READY TO GO: Lockyer Valley Growers president Michael Sippel, QAWN project manager and agriculture workforce officer for Southern Queensland Karen George, Growcom CEO Pat Hannan, FarmReady founder and director Janne Dipple and Lockyer Valley Alliance founding chair Keith Jackwitz at the launch of the FarmReady HUB. Lachlan McIvor

FOR many farmers in the Lockyer Valley, welcoming new workers onto the farm one morning, only to have some pack up and leave by lunch, is all too common a problem.

A new service hoping to ease jobseekers into agricultural work, and ensure they are well-equipped to take it on, was launched last Thursday.

The FarmReady HUB will not only give workers everything they need to start working before they arrive on the farm, but offer a glimpse of what kind of work they will be doing.

FarmReady founder and director Janne Dipple said the service would handle workers' documentation and give them access to a video library, easing pressure on the entire chain.

"FarmReady Hub is all about educating jobseekers and empowering them with everything they need to 'have, know and do' to make the best choices for themselves,” Mrs Dipple said. "It leads them through the process to employment and beyond, in a way that includes law, knowledge on job skills and wellbeing in regional communities.

"Cutting down on time-wasting for the jobseeker and employer is important.”

The original FarmReady concept was started by the Lockyer Valley Alliance in 2000. Lockyer Valley Growers president Michael Sippel said the service, particularly one that had been modernised and was accessible by people from across the globe, was incredibly important.

"It's been needed for a long time,” he said.

"I work on farms every day with growers and (labour is) their number one concern outside of power and water.

"Farmers are time-poor, they're more focused on the bigger picture in their business.

"If workers can come to their farm and show that they've already completed the initial steps in their induction process, that's actually quite a big cost-saver to a grower.”

Topics:  agriculture farmready hub janne dipple lockyer valley growers michael sippel


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.