The Australian Conservation Foundation has appealed to the High Court over the proposed Adani coal mine.
The Australian Conservation Foundation has appealed to the High Court over the proposed Adani coal mine. Kelly Butterworth EME301014ensha

Adani mine faces second High Court appeal

A SECOND group is appealing a decision handed down by the Australian High Court in the past month.

The Australian Conservation Foundation has lodged an appeal against the decision handed down by Justice John Griffiths that found the approval of Adani's Carmichael coal mine was lawful.

The action follows that of Adrian Burragubba, the senior traditional owner who ran the legal action on behalf of the Wangan and Jagalingou people of Central Queensland against Adani and the State of Queensland.

Mr Burragubba announced on September 8 that he has filed an appeal to the full bench of the Federal Court of Australia, challenging the decision of Justice John Reeves in relation to the Queensland Government's issuing of mining leases for Adani's Carmichael coal mine.

The Australian Conservation Foundation posted on Facebook today "this morning, on behalf of all Australians who love our reef, we lodged an appeal on the Federal Court's decision that found the government's approval of Adani's Carmichael coal mine lawful."

"...we don't accept that our Federal Environment Minister has the right to ignore the impact 4.6 billion tonnes of climate pollution would have on our Great Barrier Reef, just because it's too hard to measure."

Queensland Resources Council executive officer Michael Roche has hit out at the court action.

"This is just one in a long line of anti-coal activists' attempts to delay jobs and economic growth to Queensland while pretending that a refusal to supply our coal will mean that countries like India will not simply source their coal from elsewhere," Mr Roche said. 

"Once again the ACF is using the taxpayer-funded Environmental Defenders Office to put forward its fallacious argument that stopping a single coal mine in Central Queensland will influence the level of global emissions. 

"We know that according to the International Energy Agency coal use continues to grow over the coming decades. Therefore we have to recognise that renewables alone will not be able to meet the world's appetite for energy and Queensland's higher quality black coal is well placed to meet a large share of that demand."

Mr Roche said the world would need a mix of energy not only to meet the demand for energy, but to measure up to agreements at COP21 in Paris last December, where nearly 200 countries submitted their commitments (known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDCs) towards keeping global temperature increases to below 2 degrees celsius.


Bushfire reported near Glen Esk

Bushfire reported near Glen Esk

People in the area may be affected by smoke

Newly planted trees stolen straight out of soil in parklands

Newly planted trees stolen straight out of soil in parklands

The group planted 35 trees for National Tree Day earlier this year.

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