The adorable Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog was the most commonly-recorded frog in Queensland during last year’s FrogID week.
The adorable Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog was the most commonly-recorded frog in Queensland during last year’s FrogID week.

Record a frog call and help save a vital species

The Australian Museum is calling on all Aussies to help find our nation’s missing frogs during this year’s FrogID Week.

This citizen science project invites homeowners to explore their surrounds and record the unique and sometimes strange calls of their local frogs, from November 8-17 this year.

The goal is to use this information to map frog locations and populations.

Dr Jodi Rowley, Australian Museum and UNSW Sydney Curator of Amphibian & Reptile Conservation Biology, said calls recorded by people all across the country had been vital to understanding what species are where; and how they are being impacted by environmental changes.

“We need as many frog calls recorded this year as possible in order to build our database and compare year-on-year information. The more people can record and submit frog calls during FrogID Week this year, the better,” she said.

“Get outside at dusk or after rain to listen for frogs and send us their calls. It’s simple to do and you’ll be helping to save Australia’s frogs.”

Frogs are one of the first animal species to feel the effects of environmental changes, with declining frog populations being one of the key criteria for measuring the impacts of climate change and pollution on Australia’s waterways, wildlife and ecosystems.

This is only the second year the FrogID week has been operated, but the program has already met with massive success.

From the frog data recorded in Australia over the past 240 years, in less than two years, FrogID is responsible for producing more than 20 per cent of this information, thanks in large part to citizen participants.

Of the 240 frog species known to live in Australia, 187 have had their calls recorded by FrogID, and the aim this year is to identify the calls of these ‘missing’ frogs.

“While we’re keen to get audio for our ‘missing’ frogs this year, we still want all the other frogs and lots of them. We need the help of people all around the nation to gather audio of frogs in city parks, suburban backyards, regional properties, remote locations, everywhere.” Dr Rowley said.

To take part, download the FrogID app, step outside, and record your local amphibians.

Find out more by visiting www.frogid.net.au


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