Peter Farrer collects bottles in his two 44 gallon drums and take them down to the Laidley collection site every few months for a refund. He keeps a bin nearby so he can easily dispose of the lids.
Peter Farrer collects bottles in his two 44 gallon drums and take them down to the Laidley collection site every few months for a refund. He keeps a bin nearby so he can easily dispose of the lids. Ebony Graveur

'People are missing out on money'

WHILE plenty of people are attempting to turn their plastic, aluminium and glass into cash, there's an important rule many are forgetting - and it's costing them money.

Aspiring to incentivise recycling and reduce waste and litter, the Containers for Change program invites people to return eligible plastic items in exchange for a refund.

General manager for Container Exchange processing site Robert Evelyn said though his sites processed a great number of recyclables, a considerable portion were ineligible.

"People are missing out on money,” Mr Evelyn said.

"They need to take the lids off. If they leave the lids on, they don't receive a refund payment.”

As contact numbers are not recorded when somebody makes a submission, staff at processing sites are unable to contact recyclers if their submission cannot be processed.

"If a person drops their bags or boxes off with lids still on the containers, we can't contact them to tell them they can take the lids off and get their refund,” he said.

"We don't know who they are.”

In one instance, Mr Evelyn observed a situation where more than 650 containers from one customer still had lids on and were unable to be processed.

"They dropped off about 1000 containers,” he said.

"And we had no way of contacting them to let them know why they hadn't received their full payment.”

While some find the process confusing, Peter Farrer has a system set up at his Hatton Vale property.

"I have two 44-gallon drums and I just fill them up and take them to the Laidley dump,” he said.

"Beside the drums I have a bin and I take the lids off and chuck them in the bin.”

Since the scheme launched and with the help of his grandchildren, he has turned in over 20,000 bottles.

"To me it was quite simple so I registered online,” Mr Farrer said.

"I read the terms and conditions and it explained what you could and could not dump. I thought it was quite straightforward.”


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