Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL
Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL

Pandemic foodies get taste for Lockyer fresh veggies on TV

THE ROLE farmers play, and where food comes from has become increasingly important during the coronavirus pandemic, Mulgowie farmer Fabian Carniel says.

So much so, the Mulgowie Farming Company CEO has highlighted the Lockyer Valley’s salad bowl on a Channel 10 network series My Market Kitchen.

Mr Carniel appeared on the show yesterday, showcasing the farm’s beans, alongside the show’s chef and dietitian Jemma O’Hanlon.

“Jemma took the time to understand the importance of how healthy soil and industry-leading farming practices can impact the quality of fresh produce,” Mr Carniel said.

“There is a linkage between soil quality, food quality and human health and a great deal of work goes into ensuring we have the healthiest possible soil.”

Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel and staff in a broccoli field. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL
Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel and staff in a broccoli field. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL

My Market Kitchen, which partnered with Hort Innovations Australia, features farmers in 12 segments of the show, where they visit farms and tell the stories about growing food that Australians eat every day.

On the show, each grower’s produce is transformed into easy and delicious meals.

“To have a national program such as My Market Kitchen feature Mulgowie’s locally grown Green Beans, is a testament to the efforts of our Mulgowie farmers who ensure we are producing the highest quality and tastiest fresh produce,” Mr Carniel said

“With consumer behaviour heavily influenced by cooking shows and social media, the pandemic continues to play out with social distancing and the lockdown-induced revival of home cooking and the dramatic rise of the online home delivery meal solutions.

Last year, Mulgowie Farming Company was named the Lockyer Valley’s business of the year.

Mr Carniel said coronavirus had caused some impacts on the agricultural business, including the Lockyer Valley.

Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel and staff in a broccoli field. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL
Mulgowie Farming Company CEO Fabian Carniel and staff in a broccoli field. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL

He said loyal seasonal workers with extended visas had stayed at the Mulgowie-based farm, but when they left the industry would feel the impact of worker shortages.

“Although the dust has not settled on the impact of the pandemic crisis, it is becoming increasingly clear that our fresh food supply chain systems are needing to become even more agile and resilient,” he said.

“We have been fortunate to be able to continue to operate when many businesses have experienced a downturn.

“The agriculture industry has really banded together during COVID, to collaborate and collectively prepare for COVID challenges to workforce safety, operational continuity and market volatility.”


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