6-year-old Garnet Sharpley is very lucky to not be too badly hurt after falling from an upstairs window.
6-year-old Garnet Sharpley is very lucky to not be too badly hurt after falling from an upstairs window. Mike Richards GLA230417FALL

Gladstone mum's warning after son falls out second-storey window

>> EARLIER: 6-year-old hospitalised after fall from second-storey window

GARNET Sharpley is lucky to have escaped serious injury after falling two and a half metres from a second-storey window at his West Gladstone home on Saturday morning.

The bright and bubbly six-year-old was rushed to Gladstone Hospital just after midday following the fall but was released yesterday morning after doctors found no serious injuries.

"He still has lower back pain - he can't jump or anything because if he puts pressure on to his backbone it hurts," mum Cassie Ramsey said.

"It's definitely a miracle that nothing more serious was injured... the doctors were really surprised.

"He actually just wanted to stay in hospital - he loved the playroom."

Garnet fell from the window after a flyscreen he was leaning on gave way.

"He went to say hello to his friend who lives behind us, he's leant against the flyscreen and he's just gone out the window," Cassie said.

6-year-old Garnet Sharpley is very lucky to not be too badly hurt after falling from an upstairs window.
6-year-old Garnet Sharpley is very lucky to not be too badly hurt after falling from an upstairs window. Mike Richards GLA230417FALL

"I was in the lounge room and his little sister came out and told me he was outside... I found it really weird because I lock my doors. Then it twigged he must have fallen out."

Cassie ran outside to find Garnet lying on the ground.

"I carried him inside and told him to lay still on the couch," she said.

"He didn't brace himself so that's why there were no broken arms."

Cassie said anyone still using older-style flyscreens held in place with rubber cord should upgrade to the newer style of security screens, especially if they had children.

"I'm definitely going to get a new secure one, the (metal) ones that are screwed into the window," she said.

"And he won't be climbing up or leaning on it any more... he's definitely learnt his lesson.

"I'm just grateful it wasn't worse. I'm not too sure if I'm going to send him to school tomorrow!"

 

LOOKING BACK | Child safety

>> Gladstone's public hospital treats more than 300 for falls

>> CCTV: More children falling between trains and platforms

>> WATCH: Horror as toddler climbs out apartment window

>> Toddler 'stable but serious' after falling six metres

 

Preventing falls from windows and balconies

Accidental falls account for 46% of injury hospitalisations for children aged between 5 and 14, according to a 2012 study by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

They account for 42% of injury hospitalistions for children aged between 0 and 4, making it the leading cause of hospitalisation for both age brackets.

To prevent children falling from windows, The Children's Hospital at Westmead recommends:

  • All windows above the ground floor to be opened no more than 12.5cm
  • All windows have locks or latches fitted to stop those windows opening further
  • Beds and other furniture are kept away from windows so children cannot climb up to them
  • Parents do not rely on flyscreens to prevent a child from falling out of a window.

LEAVE NOW: Toogoolawah fire threatens properties

LEAVE NOW: Toogoolawah fire threatens properties

Police are diverting traffic in the area

Two week dance competition brings thousands to Gatton

Two week dance competition brings thousands to Gatton

Tickets are available for purchase at the door.

Drought relief could fund road upgrade

Drought relief could fund road upgrade

Somerset Mayor calls for road upgrade.

Local Partners