While the weather in the Lockyer Valley can be similar to Meab Mdimi's home country, the agribusiness practices are worlds apart, she's learning all she can from her time in Australia to help benefit her community.
While the weather in the Lockyer Valley can be similar to Meab Mdimi's home country, the agribusiness practices are worlds apart, she's learning all she can from her time in Australia to help benefit her community. Meg Bolton

Meab follows her passions to Australia

FEW would dispute farming is the backbone of the Lockyer Valley community.

Attracting visitors from across the world, farms can provide a steady income, visa and provide people with skills they will use for life.

Tanzanian national Meab Mdimi considered what she has learned about agriculture as invaluable.

Studying local farms theoretically and practically, Ms Mdimi planned to complete her Masters in Agribusiness at University of Queensland, Gatton, to benefit her community back home.

"I get different perspectives to see how we can develop our agribusiness sector better,” Ms Mdimi said.

"What I'm looking for is to get new skills, new techniques and new exposure that will expose me to a wide range of techniques and issues around agribusiness, supply chains and around global agriculture and food systems.”

Halfway through her masters degree, Ms Mdimi wanted to see Tanzania's farming community thrive, she planned to implement what she has learned through her studies.

"The technology and the skill is a lot bigger in Australia and the way the chain is organised is working is a lot more organised than back home,” she said.

"Agriculture plays a very big role especially in the rural areas (in Tanzania) so supporting their capacity to actually produce more and better and to increase production and productivity.

"Quality is something I've learned a lot from the field work we've done and from the classroom studies I've gone through.”

Whether it's Africa or Australia, Ms Mdimi's passion is helping people, in her spare time she volunteered as the Rotary of Lockyer Valley secretary.

The group provided her with the chance to give something back to the community she studied in.

"We meet once a week to discuss fundraising and events,” Ms Mdimi said.

The group's latest event had Lockyer Valley representatives wheeling across the Lockyer as part of their Wheelchair Challenge in a bid to improve wheelchair access in the region.

"Community service is one of my passions,” she said.

Ms Mdimi's professional experience also reflected her compassionate nature, with experience educating small Tanzanian agribusiness people.

"My role has been training the farmers, developing techniques and technologies that agribusinesses can use to work better with the farmers but also building the capacity for agribusinesses to better link with farmers,” she said.

"A lot of things need to be improved they are very big things... but there are still micro issues that can be tackled on an organisational level.”

Ms Mdimi planned to continue her degree and volunteer work in the Lockyer Valley next year and hoped to start her PHD in 2020.


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