'Marlins Man' happy to rile Major League Baseball fans

Laurence Leavy, aka the Marlins Man, looks on at some World Series action with fellow baseball fan and admirer Sidhardha Lakireddy.
Laurence Leavy, aka the Marlins Man, looks on at some World Series action with fellow baseball fan and admirer Sidhardha Lakireddy.

AMERICAN sports fanatic Laurence Leavy is set to anger more Kansas City Royals fans at the Major League Baseball World Series ... by sitting directly behind the plate in his bright-orange Miami Marlins jersey.

But he couldn't give a damn.

Leavy caused a nationwide sensation throughout the US by being the odd man out among a sea of blue for games one and two of the Fall Classic, against San Francisco, in Kansas City.

So much so that he was asked to move up to a catered box by club officials, and lured with Royals merchandise, to keep the home-town fans happy.

But the 58-year-old didn't budge and, as a result, has developed a cult following on Twitter under the name 'Marlins Man'.

He has over 13,000 followers, in fact.

Since the World Series began that figure climbed from just 175.

The Marlins Man is well connected to brokers who ring him up with the best seats in the house, to the best baseball and basketball games, among others.

Leavy can afford this lifestyle partly because he has no wife and children, and supplements his income as a workers' compensation lawyer by buying real estate and race horses.

"I leave my year open during this current period and I save up all year to buy these tickets," he told APN.

"It's crazy what's happening (the new-found fame). I didn't expect this. People who have been reading about me are so happy to see me.

"I'm a sports guy. I'm not like some celebrity who shows up to a sporting event to get a picture taken.

"The kids love me, the grandparents love me.

"I'm going to do this until I die."

Leavy didn't leave his seat for the comfort of a viewing box in Kansas City, because sitting so close to the action is like an addictive drug to him.

"I wanted to be there - the only reason I sit so close is that I had a problem with my eye when I first started doing this, and I got eye surgery," he said.

"So I went and sat behind the bench. And then it became like a drug addiction.

"The owner (of the Royals) was very upset, and he thought I was distracting from the attention of his team.

"He (the official) offered me lots of things - he offered to move me upstairs, but I said 'I'm going to stay here'.

"A Royals fan would have loved the signed jersey and the bat and ball, but to a Marlins fan they meant nothing to me."

There's more of a sporting feast to come for Leavy, who attended 18 NBA playoff games around the country in 20 days earlier this year.

"I just got invited to the Cleveland Cavaliers' opening night (against New York on October 31 AEST)," he said.

"(Cleveland superstar) LeBron (James) hates me. I can't wait to go, 'hey LeBron remember me from Miami?'"

The Marlins Man's parochialism would be enough to make the 'Sea Pimp' proud.

Shannon Love, nicknamed the Sea Pimp, told APN at a Seattle Seahawks NFL home game earlier this month that supporting his team is a "lifestyle".

"I'm invested in the fans, in that we are accountable, we mean something and now our names are reflected around the world," said Love, who has been a Seahawks season ticket holder since 1976.

Topics:  editors picks major league baseball world series

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