A new report has shown Fraser Coast cane farmers will profit more by planting break crops.
A new report has shown Fraser Coast cane farmers will profit more by planting break crops. Contributed

Legumes prove profitable

QUEENSLAND economists have urged Fraser Coast canegrowers to avoid re-planting sugarcane to maximise profits this season.

A new report from the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation has shown canegrowers will profit more by planting legume crops as part of a rotation.

Agronomist Neil Haplin and economist Trish Cameron said maintaining legume break cropping increased profits even at times of high sugar prices.

Break cropping inserts a different type of crop into the main farming plan to reduce the impact of weeds, pests and diseases associated with sugarcane.

DEEDI tests showed profit dropped by more than $400 a hectare when sugarcane was replanted.

The tests showed break cropping increased yields from each sugarcane crop.

The report also showed costs in fertiliser and land preparation were reduced when plants such as peanuts and soybeans were planted as break crops.


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