SPRING CLEAN: Ipswich City Council removed piles of shopping trolleys, tyres and other debris from Bundamba Creek on Wednesday.
SPRING CLEAN: Ipswich City Council removed piles of shopping trolleys, tyres and other debris from Bundamba Creek on Wednesday. Andrew Korner

Junk fished from creek to help clean-up Bremer

IN THE same week that the Bremer River received a slightly improved D- health rating, Ipswich City Council has taken to cleaning piles of debris out of Bundamba Creek.

A major tributary of the Bremer, the Bundamba Creek was still burdened with the trash left behind by major floods in 2011 and 2013.

Dozens of shopping trolleys, truck tyres, garbage bins and piles of timber sleepers, logs and pallets were plucked from the creek on Wednesday.

City environment and conservation spokeswoman Cheryl Bromage said funding for the clean up was coming from the Bremer River Fund, in partnership with council.

The fund received a grant of $50,000 from the Queensland Government under the Everyone's Environment program for community-based creek improvements.

"This current work involves clearing the creek of man-made objects such as trolleys, tyres and pallets, with every effort made to not disturb the natural flora and fauna," Cr Bromage said.

"In the past year more than 8000 trees have been planted and 400 volunteers involved in activities to improve local parks and creeks."

Bundamba area representative Cr Bruce Casos said he had seen a positive response from high school students and residents, who had participated in the replanting of vulnerable river bank sections recently.

The rejuvenation coincides with the release of the Healthy Waterways report card for the Bremer, which showed an improvement from an F to a D-.

While it was by no means a good result, Mayor Paul Pisasale said it showed council's efforts were making a difference.

"Council is working hard to do its bit to keep the Bremer healthy and working with our friends in the Queensland Government and the business community to ensure everyone has the right policies and practises in place to protect the river," he said. "Of particular improvement was the fact that the numbers of native fish and water insects in the river are up, both critical indicators of river health."

Environment and Conservation Committee chairperson Councillor Heather Morrow said while there are still aspects of the health of the Bremer causing concern, this was a positive result.

"We still have a way to go to deal with issues such as turbidity, chemistry and plant life," she said.


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