Inside the mind of Christmas Day bomber

The Tennessee man who blew up his explosives-laden RV in Nashville on Christmas Day was a suspected 5G conspiracy theorist who gave away his property and warned the world "is never going to forget me" before carrying out the terrible act.

More chilling details are emerging about the final movements of tech expert Anthony Quinn Warner, who was the only fatality in the December 25 blast that damaged multiple buildings, including a telco building, and injured three people.

Warner had experience with electronics and alarms and had also worked as a computer consultant for a Nashville realtor, according to public records.

 

Anthony Quinn Warner has been identified as the Nashville bomber.
Anthony Quinn Warner has been identified as the Nashville bomber.

 

The 63-year-old, who was not previously known to police, was believed to have acted alone but authorities are yet to establish a motive.

Investigators are looking into the theory Warner was motivated by "paranoia" over 5G technology and alleged government spying.

"The unofficial motive thus far is the suspect believed 5G was the root of all deaths in the region and he'd be hailed a hero," a source close to the investigation told the Daily Mail.

The source said investigators were "waiting on the digital footprint that should finally provide us with some answers".

 

 

There is suspicion Warner targeted the AT&T building that was damaged in the blast. AT&T provides 5G service across the US and the blast scrambled local mobile service.

Meanwhile a neighbour has revealed the chilling details of a casual chat he had with Warner outside their homes days before the Christmas blast.

Rick Laude said he asked Warner on December 21 if he was expecting anything good from Santa for Christmas, AP reported.

 

 

Mr Laude said Warner told him: "Nashville and the world is never going to forget me."

The RV used in the early-morning December 25 explosion, which happened before crowds filled downtown Nashville, played a recorded announcement warning a bomb would detonate in 15 minutes. The audio then switched to a recording of Petula Clark's 1965 chart-topper Downtown before the vehicle burst into a fireball.

Police believe Warner may have been more intent on causing destruction than fatalities, given the 15-minute warning before the blast.

 

Warner was killed in the explosion and three people were injured.
Warner was killed in the explosion and three people were injured.

 

"Obviously, the audio from the vehicle warning people that an explosion was imminent, the opportunity to clear the area, certainly gives you that insight that the possibility was that he had no intention of harming anyone but himself, but that obviously plays into our investigation," Tennessee Bureau of Investigation director David Rausch told NBC's Today.

"It does appear that the intent was more destruction than death, but again, that's all still speculation at this point as we continue in our investigation."

 

LA-based music executive Michelle Swing received two free houses from the Nashville suicide bomber. Picture: Facebook
LA-based music executive Michelle Swing received two free houses from the Nashville suicide bomber. Picture: Facebook

Attention has also turned to a young music executive who was mysteriously gifted two homes by Warner on the same street in Nashville recently.

Los Angeles-based Michelle Swing, 29, paid nothing for the two properties, worth $527,600 combined, according to property records obtained by the New York Post.

They included a house in Antioch that was reportedly at the centre of a legal battle between Warner and his mother, which Warner gave to Ms Swing on November 25.

 

 

Anthony Quinn Warner’s former home in Antioch. Picture: Google Maps
Anthony Quinn Warner’s former home in Antioch. Picture: Google Maps

 

 

Ms Swing has refused to talk about how she knew Warner and claimed to have been unaware about the quitclaim deed transfer that granted her the home. An RV is parked next to the house in Google Maps images.

She said she had no idea she was given the second home.

"In the state of Tennessee you can deed property to someone else without their consent or their signature or anything," Ms Swing told the Daily Mail.

 

"I didn't even buy the house, he just deeded it over to me without my knowledge. So this is all very weird to me, that's about all I can say."

As investigators continue to probe Warner's movements before the Christmas Day blast, Mr Rausch from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said they might never get "a complete answer" as to why he did what he did.

"A lot of it will be what we can gather through interviews and ultimately what the evidence will point us toward," Mr Rausch said.

"But we may never find out the exact reasoning behind the activities that took place."

 

 

 

Originally published as Inside the mind of Christmas Day bomber


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