I'm no Mister, call Mr Master, Supreme Court justice told

A FRASER Coast man insisted a supreme court justice call him "master" in a bizarre bail application where he argued he was exercising his "right to free travel" when he was caught driving unlicensed.

Jacob James Cordie, who was discharged from the defence force with post-traumatic stress disorder, has also been charged with failing to stop for police.

The court heard he had a State Penalties Enforcement Registry suspension at the time and already had a warning letter again this year because he was close to losing all his demerit points again.

"I was exercising my right to free travel," he said.

"I wasn't driving under licence or commercial activity."

Mr Cordie said he was receiving treatment from the Veteran Affairs Department for his mental condition.

He was forced to make a bail application in Brisbane Supreme Court on Thursday after a Maryborough magistrate issued a warrant for failing to appear in court in October.

Mr Cordie was in the Maryborough courtroom but he kept saying there was no evidence he was there and claimed there had been an abuse of his human rights.

As he refused to formally "appear", a warrant for his arrest ensued.

Crown prosecutor Jane Shaw said he ordinarily would be granted bail on traffic charges but the court needed to be sure Mr Cordie would abide bail conditions to reduce the risk of reoffending.

Justice David Boddice said it appeared from the material before him that Mr Cordie did not believe the court or police had jurisdiction over him.

But Mr Cordie disagreed, saying he had a problem with a legal document saying "Mister Cordie" was present at the crime was incorrect.

He said his name was "Master Cordie".

But Mr Cordie agreed, if granted bail, he would only drive when he had a licence, report to Maryborough police every Monday and would submit to mental health treatment as directed.

Justice Boddice released him on those conditions.


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