‘I froze my eggs’ when I decided to transition from female to male

Nate Musiello always had a feeling that his body didn't match who he was.

"I always felt it, I just didn't really know what it was or how to put it into words," the Queensland boy from north of Brisbane said.

Now at 17 there is no stopping the young transgender man from living his best life. He is recovering from his "top surgery" and has had his eggs frozen so that one day he will have the children he so desperately wants. Nate is living with his girlfriend and working full-time in a pharmacy.

Considering the challenges of being a transgender kid, Nate is now happy with a super supportive mum and family.

Nate Musiello with mum Michelle Suters and dad Gabriel Musiello. Picture: Lachie Millard
Nate Musiello with mum Michelle Suters and dad Gabriel Musiello. Picture: Lachie Millard

Nate announced to his mum on March 6, 2017 that on his 15th birthday he would walk down the stairs of his home as a boy and would be called Nate.

With just two days to prepare herself his mum jumped into action and suddenly was the advocate of a transgender child.

"It is exhausting and frustrating fighting for the rights of a transgender son. I was behind him all the way. His dad and I wanted him to freeze eggs before he started puberty blockers so we found the $10,000 and with Nate's agreement he went ahead with the egg collection," mum Michelle said.

Nate was at high school when his body was changing due to taking testosterone.

"My transition was very visible and public but now that I am a bit older I feel more comfortable and at peace," he said.

Nate Musiello and his partner Jemimah Clark, 19. Picture:Lachie Millard
Nate Musiello and his partner Jemimah Clark, 19. Picture:Lachie Millard

The teenager worked several jobs to help raise the money for his "top surgery".

"I feel that I was lucky in that I grew up in a house with brothers and sisters and it wasn't really a big deal that I liked short hair and could play with any of the toys I wanted. I would raise my children in a home where boys could wear pink or boys could have long hair - away from the gender stereotypes.

"I think life is changing. Sexuality has become more fluid and the same thing will follow with gender. Children need to have freedom away from pressure to conform to perceived norms," Nate said.

Nate attended the Queensland Children's Hospital's transgender clinic which has seen an increase in patients.

The latest available data shows that in 2018, there were 207 patients, up from 48 in 2014.

A total of 171 were on puberty blockers and 30 on testosterone.

Originally published as 'I froze my eggs' when I decided to transition from female to male


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