A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video posted on social media on Thursday.
A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video posted on social media on Thursday.

UK crumbles while Harry, Meghan away on tour

WITH royal fever hitting Australian shores, there is no doubt that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's visit has done wonders for "brand Britain".

The couple have been melting hearts across the country with their cute hand holding, royal fan hugging and passionate speeches about mental health. Shockingly, they have even managed to turn red-blooded republicans into reluctant royalist.

But while Harry and Megs get ready for Saturday night's Invictus Games opening ceremony in Sydney, hundreds of thousands of Britons are preparing to descend on London for the People's March which is being billed as the UK's largest anti-Brexit demonstration.

In the lead-up to Saturday's march, a rousing video, published by anti-Brexit organisation Best For Britain, is calling on Brits to say, "I'm as angry as hell" and demand a People's Vote as confusion intensifies over what Brexit will actually mean for ordinary people.

 

A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video that was posted on social media on Thursday just days ahead of the People’s March through London.
A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video that was posted on social media on Thursday just days ahead of the People’s March through London.

 

After satirising the stereotypical characteristics of the average Brit, the video - which has been viewed 180,000 times - whips up a slice of rage, reminding those who want to remain in the European Union they are "lions" who need to "speak up" and demand a final say on the Brexit deal which appears to be tearing the country apart.

"Life can be hard," the video, which has already been viewed 180,000 times since it was published on Thursday, says. "Sometimes people don't deliver what they promised.

"Sometimes things don't turn out … quite the way we hoped.

"Sometimes it can feel like those who shout the loudest are the only ones who are heard.

"And sometimes, well, sometimes people are just massive a**eholes."

It goes on to say, "Well no more. Enough is enough.

"And even though it goes against every instinct in your quivering little British bodies, it's time to let your voice be heard.

"Speak up! Speak up, dammit! Repeat after me … I'm as angry as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!"

The timing of the video appears to coincide with Saturday's People's March where 100,000 people are expected to descend on London for what organisers hope will be the "biggest, loudest and most important" anti-Brexit march since the referendum.

However, some have suggested the video could just as easily be used by the pro-Brexit crowd to express their anger at the length of time the deal is taking and Prime Minister Teresa May's push for a soft exit from the EU.

In calling for calm on the issue, outspoken musician Billy Bragg tweeted: "Not sure it's a smart tactic to produce an anti-Brexit clip that could easily be used by your opponents to make a pro-Brexit argument.

"Also, isn't there already enough rage around this issue? What we need is dialogue. Maybe try a bit of empathy instead?"

The growing anger that has been bubbling away since the 2016 referendum now seems to be hitting boiling point.

It is threatening to tear apart the government and could potentially topple Prime Minister Teresa May's leadership, with outspoken Brexiter and former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, who resigned from the position in July amid the Brexit fallout, making a bid for the top job.

At the time, Britain was declared to be entering a "moment of crisis" in its ailing negotiations with its neighbours in the European Union - leaving the country on the brink of economic and political chaos.

In August, an advisory committee, made up of constitutional and legal experts and UK and European politicians, published a People's Vote paper suggesting that since the 2016 referendum, there had been a huge shift in the attitudes of the British public on leaving the EU.

In calling for a People's Vote, Scottish politician and diplomat Lord John Kerr, who chaired the committee, said "a political, economic and possibly constitutional crisis" was gathering across the United Kingdom.

"Our view is that the most viable and democratic way of resolving it is to allow the public to have their say on Brexit," Lord Kerr wrote. "To deny them a voice challenges the basic principle of informed consent.

"People want the right to decide. Polling by (market research company) YouGov this summer has demonstrated clear backing, by 45 per cent to 35 per cent, for a public vote on the outcome of Brexit negotiations.

"This rises to a margin of two-to-one - 50 per cent to 25 per cent - if talks break down and the UK leaves without any deal."

 

A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video that was posted on social media on Thursday just days ahead of the People’s March through London.
A screen shot from anti-Brexit group Best For Britain’s video that was posted on social media on Thursday just days ahead of the People’s March through London.

 

The paper was published amid growing angst and uncertainty about what the Brexit deal would mean for ordinary Brits - such as working and travelling around Europe and for EU citizens living and working in Britain.

"If it made sense for Parliament to ask the people for their view on the principle, it makes sense to give them a say on what Brexit would mean in practice," the 29-page People's Vote paper said.

"Indeed, it is arguably more important that the people should vote on what lies ahead, when the consequences have become clearer, than before any of them were known."

In order to secure a People's Vote, primary legislation would need to pass through the British parliament and while support appeared to be growing, there is currently no majority support for the move in the House of Commons.

While the British crisis appears to be deepening amid confusion on what it will actually mean for the average joe, it remains to be seen what impact - if any - the People's March will have on the views of those in Westminster.


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