TIRELESS EFFORT: Gayle Daetz was honoured by the Leukaemia Foundation in 2017, for her work in fundraising hundreds of thousands of dollars
TIRELESS EFFORT: Gayle Daetz was honoured by the Leukaemia Foundation in 2017, for her work in fundraising hundreds of thousands of dollars

Fundraiser fatigue having impact on numbers

THANKS to the ongoing drought, raging bushfires, dwindling water supplies, the rising cost of living, or even personal tragedies, there are more people in need than ever before, and therefore there’s an ever-increasing amount of charities offering support.

There are more than 96 million charitable challenges and events hosted around Australia each yeah, and this over-saturation of causes is making it a chore for people to take part.

Data released last week by ahm Health Insurance has indicated up to 93 per cent of Australians find it difficult to participate in fundraisers and charities.

The research surveyed 1035 Australians over 18 years of age, with responses extrapolated using Census data.

Several barriers were mentioned by those who participated in the survey, including being too busy to participate, and being ensure of where to start, due to the sheer number of charities.

Gayle Daetz, founder of Team J & J, has been fundraising on behalf of the Leukaemia Foundation for many years.

She agrees it has been getting more difficult.

“There’s so many charities out there wanting to fundraise for different organisations,” she said.

“There’s more organisations coming out of the woodwork wanting donations. Businesses are always bombarded with requests and letters and so forth.”

Mrs Daetz has been involved with charity work for almost 20 years, since her son Jody passed away at age 23, after a six-year battle with leukaemia.

World’s Greatest Shave, High Teas, Healing Fairs, golf days, fashion parades, and quilt raffles are just some of the myriad of fundraisers Mrs Daetz has carried out over the years in her son’s name.

In her experience, she has found people can still be very generous, but are more likely to do so when they have a personal connection to the cause.

“People are still contributing, very much so. It all depends on their circumstances. If they know someone who’s had cancer, they tend to be a lot more generous.”


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