LUCKY ESCAPE: John Nyari (above) was lucky to escape his home last week after it was engulfed by flames. It is now completely gutted, with John having to live in his shed until his insurance comes through.
LUCKY ESCAPE: John Nyari (above) was lucky to escape his home last week after it was engulfed by flames. It is now completely gutted, with John having to live in his shed until his insurance comes through.

Flood victim's house up in flames

LIFE was just returning to normal for John Nyari after floodwaters inundated his Laidley home in January, but he once again found himself scrambling to safety as fire engulfed his house last week.

The 61-year-old woke at 3.30am last Thursday to the sound of fire crackling with his home of 23 years fully alight and was forced to jump out of his bedroom window to save himself.

Fire crews arrived at the Short Street home at 3.45am and contained the blaze by 4am, however it was too late with the fire destroying all of Mr Nyari's possessions and leaving his beloved home an empty shell.

"If it's not one thing it's another," Mr Nyari said.

"I went to bed at 11.45pm and it woke me around 3.30am. The bottom of the door was glowing and I felt the door and it was hot and I didn't want to open the door in fear of a back draft so I decided to jump out the window.

"As soon as I opened the window to jump out, the room filled with smoke from under the door."

Mr Nyari, whose son also lives with him but was away at the time of the fire, was left relatively unscathed from the incident apart from a sore back and large bruise above his tailbone.

Police believed the fire started from an electric bar heater which was left turned on in the lounge room of the Short St house.

Fire damage to the home was too severe for repair, leaving Mr Nyari little choice but to demolish what is left of his home.

"Normally I don't use an electric heater because I have the wood heater," Mr Nyari said as he surveyed the burnt lounge room.

"There's nothing we can do with it except pull it down."

Mr Nyari, who had stayed in his home throughout the floods earlier this year and saw water rise a couple feet above his floor, was determined to rebuild and start over at the same location.

"(The floodwaters) did come through the house but I didn't cop it that bad, not like some other people did," he said.

For now, Mr Nyari said he would live in his shed until he found somewhere more suitable to stay permanently and awaited confirmation from his insurance company.

As soon as I opened the window to jump out, the room filled with smoke from under the door.


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