NEARLY THERE: Jenny Kunde and Naomi Mason launched the petition calling for the State Government not to appeal the court’s decision on the 2011 flood class action. Picture: Rob Williams
NEARLY THERE: Jenny Kunde and Naomi Mason launched the petition calling for the State Government not to appeal the court’s decision on the 2011 flood class action. Picture: Rob Williams

Flood victims’ brief reprieve as waiting game continues

VICTIMS of the 2011 floods breathed a sigh of relief last week when the State Government confirmed it would not appeal a landmark ruling against it.

But the battle surrounding the devastating floods, and cause of them, isn't over yet - with two other parties yet to declare whether they will appeal.

Naomi Mason and Jenny Kunde began campaigning earlier this month, following the landmark ruling by the New South Wales Supreme Court, which found the State Government, Seqwater and Sunwater exacerbated the flooding that destroyed thousands of houses.

Both Ms Mason and Ms Kunde's homes were inundated during the devastating floods.

They began a petition soon after the judgement calling on the Government to rule out appealing the decision, to allow victims like themselves to move on.

Nearly 300 people have signed the petition since it was started.

Last Thursday, their wish was partially granted when Attorney-General Yvette D'Ath ruled out an appeal by the state.

"The Queensland Government will not appeal the NSW Supreme Court decision concerning the Southeast Queensland Flood Class Action," Ms D'Ath said.

"This decision is separate to any action that may be taken by other parties to the NSW Supreme Court decision."

For Ms Mason, it was a huge relief.

"It was the right thing to do as far as we were concerned," Ms Mason said.

"It's been a long time coming but it was just tremendous news and it's going to make Christmas even better this year."

Jenny Kunde was also pleased with the announcement, but with Sunwater and Seqwater still able to appeal, it was not all positive.

"I was really excited about that until I realised that SEQ and Sunwater could still appeal so that kind of dimmed it a little bit," Ms Kunde said.

"At first I thought that was it - decision made, we were going to see some sort of result and put an end to all of this."

Neither Seqwater nor Sunwater have made their intentions clear yet, and Ms Kunde and Ms Mason are both worried an appeal could push back compensation and closure for victims even further.

"This could go on for years if they appeal it from what I can see. It's a very big concern for us. I just want to see an end to it," Ms Kunde said.

Ms Mason reissued her call for the state-owned companies to rule out appealing the decision.

"I'd think now would be an appropriate time for them to come forward and own up to their mistake so everyone can move forward," she said.

"Everyone wants to get on with their lives."


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