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Keep fire hydrants clear say firies

SAVING LIVES: Michelle Hull from Queensland Urban Utilities with Gatton Fire Station Captain Geoff Dixon with one of the Lockyer Valley’s almost 2000 fire hydrants.
SAVING LIVES: Michelle Hull from Queensland Urban Utilities with Gatton Fire Station Captain Geoff Dixon with one of the Lockyer Valley’s almost 2000 fire hydrants. Amy Lyne

THERE is a simple way we can all help our local firefighters - and it's as simple as noticing where there are hydrants.

Hydrants can be spotted by their yellow cover, yellow arrow on the curb or blue cats eye in the middle of the road.

And according to Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, it especially important during the cooler months.

Gatton Fire Station Captain Geoff Dixon said it is important we know where they are and not park or put turf over them.

"We find gardens encroach over them, and eventually grow over them," Captain Dixon said.

"If it takes the fire fighter two to three minutes to find the hydrant, that is time we could have spent saving a house.

"Every minute you lose, that is another percentage of your house gone - we have to connect to hydrants to do our job.

"Any faults should be reported to Queensland Urban Utilities."

QUU spokesperson Michelle Cull said crews had inspected hydrants in Laidley and would inspect Gatton in the coming weeks.

"QUU owns 100,000 fire hydrants across its network, including 1913 in the Lockyer Valley, which are maintained under a rolling program that costs about $5 million every year," she said.

"If you spot a fire hydrant that is covered in grass or missing its cat's eye marker, let us know so we can address the issue."

Any issues can be reported to QUU by calling 13 23 64.

Topics:  fire and emergency services queensland urban utilities


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