Fewer Australians are suffering severe traumatic brain injuries on our roads
Fewer Australians are suffering severe traumatic brain injuries on our roads

Fewer Australian brains being damaged in car crashes

THE amount of severe traumatic brain injuries on Australia's roads has fallen significantly in the past nine years, new medical research has shown.

A paper published in the Medical Journal of Australia today by researchers at Monash University and Melbourne's Alfred Hospital showed an 11% fall in traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in car occupants between 2006 and 2014.

It showed the number of severe TBIs caused by car, motorcycle, bicycle and pedestrian collisions fell from five cases to 3.2 cases for every 100,000 Australians over the nine-year period.

While other research shows severe injuries and deaths are much more likely to occur on rural and regional roads, the study shows the overall number of severe TBIs in Australia is declining.

Chief study author Dr Ben Beck said it suggested that improved road injury prevention methods were working.

The study also looked at TBIs from accidents off the roads, revealing a 4% rise in TBIs among people who had suffered a fall, and mortality from such falls was highest among Australians aged 65 years or older.


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