Dinner party passion fuels CBD’s prize-winning cafe

ANGE Jackwitz has an undying love for food.

The Jak and Mo Taste Co owner says it is the only explanation for her love of everything to do with food - not just the food itself but the ritual of dinner parties and bringing people together to eat.

"It's not so much the food … no, it is the food … but I love the culture food creates," Ms Jackwitz said.

"I've always said I was born in the wrong country because I love the Spanish table, I love the Italians coming together and passing food and swapping stories and drinking wine - just that whole intimacy of how food brings people together."

After being a stay-at-home mum for 12 years, she realised the time was right to venture into a dream project she had always fantasised about.

As her husband said, it was now or never.

"He said 'you've always wanted to do it so go and do it'," Ms Jackwitz said.

"I've never been in business before this so I am literally learning every day and I'm trying to make it accountable for itself."

Her cosy Gatton CBD cafe opened in January 2016.

"I went into it very casually, just starting to ask questions about council, looking at sites, looking at shops," she said.

"It kept growing and evolving until all of a sudden, I'm in too deep and realised we're doing this."

Jak and Mo Taste Co has since been nominated several times at the Lockyer Business, Training and Apprenticeship Awards.

At the 2019 awards, the cafe secured its second win, nabbing the Food and Dining Cafe award.

"We all got together as a team here and decided to nominate because we've got the finalist certificate for three consecutive years," Ms Jackwitz said.

"I thought, if we happen to make finalist, we will at least have a certificate on the wall and it's consecutive."

The cafe recently took on a qualified chef who Ms Jackwitz plans to work closely with to further develop the cafe's menu.

Some of the cafe's regular customers tell Mrs Jackwitz her cafe is too small for how popular it is - but moving to a bigger room is not on the cards.

"I like small spaces and I wanted an alley-style cafe … When I go to shops and cafes, I don't like walking into a big, vulnerable space," she said.

"I find this is really intimate and small, and it can be empty and it doesn't feel desperately quiet, and it can be full and it brings life - people say to go bigger and bigger but no, I like the close intimacy."


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