Supplied undated photo obtained Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2010 of Charlie the Crocodile, whose owner is facing a legal battle to keep him, swimming in his pool on the Casey family's cane farm south of Proserpine, North Queensland.  John Casey, 49, was just two years old when Charlie joined his family as a six-inch hatchling after her mother was shot by a hunter in 1963 and is now receiving a long list of demands from state government if he wants to keep Charlie at home. (AAP Image/Townsville Bulletin) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Supplied undated photo obtained Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2010 of Charlie the Crocodile, whose owner is facing a legal battle to keep him, swimming in his pool on the Casey family's cane farm south of Proserpine, North Queensland. John Casey, 49, was just two years old when Charlie joined his family as a six-inch hatchling after her mother was shot by a hunter in 1963 and is now receiving a long list of demands from state government if he wants to keep Charlie at home. (AAP Image/Townsville Bulletin) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY TOWNSVILLE BULLETIN

CROC DEBATE: "Shooting them is just the easy way out"

FRASER Coast residents have had their say on the State Opposition's claims to allow the killing of crocs considered to be troublesome, in a bid to keep people safe.

Jason Frazer believes education rather than removal of the crocs is the best option.

"Anyone that knows crocodiles knows that you remove one another takes its place shoot one another will eventually take its place too.

"The people that are taken from crocs are usually careless, uneducated or just plain stupid," he said.

Jason said growing up in the Cape meant education came first.

"Shoot them and people will think the water is safe once more only to be taken by another," he said.

Karla Hetherington thinks shooting the animals is the easy way out.

"If there is a law in place for them to be relocated then relocate them, shooting them is just the easy way out," she said.

Peter Solomon believes a properly organised and managed cull could bring thousands of dollars to the economy in the form of hunting tourism.

" Do you know how much wealthy hunters would pay for the chance to shoot a crocodile. If there is going to be a cull it would be sensible to profit from it," Peter said.

Christine Hogan can see both sides to the argument.

"If a croc is proving to be a threat to humans and our residential environments then they should be culled or shot...but on the other hand, if they are happily existing within their own habitats or limits then what is the problem?" she questioned.

Under the proposed new laws, crocodiles "posing a danger to human life" will be euthanised.

Power to shoot the reptiles will be given to authorised rangers in circumstances where "safe and quick capture" is not practical.

Chronicle reader Shirley Ellingworth would like the crocs left alone.

"They have not attacked or eaten anyone. They are natural and in their environment," she said.


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