Officers from Somerset police stations learnt how to find their way around an ambulance at a cross training session at the Toogoolawah Ambulance Station.
Officers from Somerset police stations learnt how to find their way around an ambulance at a cross training session at the Toogoolawah Ambulance Station.

Cops head to ambulance station for ‘critical’ education

AT THE scene of a critical car crash, a Somerset police officer found herself struggling to help an ambulance officer who needed a piece of lifesaving equipment handed to her.

Toogoolawah Police Acting Sergeant Claire Heptinstall said paramedic Tanya King was working to treat a patient and asked Sgt Heptinstall for help.

“She needed us to get equipment out of the ambulance to help clear the person’s airway,” Sgt Heptinstall said.

“We didn’t know where it was so we had to ask the fireys who were more familiar with the layout of the ambulance to get it out for us.”

Sgt Heptinstall and her colleague Acting Officer-in-charge Luke Rowley realised they could make themselves more useful at critical moments.

READ MORE: Somerset cop’s idea set to shake up emergency response

On Monday, officers from the Esk and Toogoolawah police station took a trip to the Toogoolawah Ambulance station.

Toogoolawah Ambulance Station Officer-in-charge Tanya King demonstrated to police officers how to use both manual and electric stretchers and the stair-chair – in case they ever needed to do it themselves.

Officers from Somerset police stations learnt how to find their way around an ambulance at a cross training session at the Toogoolawah Ambulance Station.
Officers from Somerset police stations learnt how to find their way around an ambulance at a cross training session at the Toogoolawah Ambulance Station.

The trip was part of a series of training sessions in which emergency service professionals in the Brisbane Valley region would share knowledge with one another to improve how they worked together.

“There are often jobs that require all hands on deck from emergency services such as serious traffic incidents or natural disasters,” Sgt Heptinstall said.

READ MORE: Why fire trucks park on the wrong side of the road

“Having the knowledge to be able to assist each other is vital.”

Acting Officer-in-Charge at the Esk Police Station, Luke Rowley said he had the idea for police, firefighters and ambulance workers to cross-train one another when he was helping fireys at the scene of a house fire.

He said he was carrying hoses and trying to fit one to a standpoint, which he had never done before, when he realised how much easier it could be.

“I thought, if we were able to cross train our staff for some of these basic duties, it would only make it easier for the responding emergency service to carry out their role,” he said.

Read more stories by Ebony Graveur.


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