Clive Palmer says he is ready to serve.
Clive Palmer says he is ready to serve. Brett Wortman

Clive Palmer tells journos 'it's time to lift your game'

UPDATED:  NEWLY-MINTED federal MP Clive Palmer has promised he will "fully retire from business", in his first day as a politician in Canberra.

Mr Palmer made the comments before launching a scathing attack on News Corporation, after reports alleging he had bullied an employee were printed on Tuesday.

He said journalists had to lift their game, hitting out at The Australian's Hedley Thomas, who has written several articles about Mr Palmer and his business interests.

"Why have a go at us because people agree with us and they don't agree with the Courier-Mail," Mr Palmer told a Courier-Mail reporter.

Earlier in the day, the businessman and hotelier declared he was an "100% politician - that's what I'm doing, nothing else".

But he would not commit to attend parliamentary sittings, declaring he was "not going to commit to sit in a box and do nothing".

Mr Palmer also said "the economy is in a bad way", hitting out at Treasurer Joe Hockey's moves to raise the nation's debt ceiling from $300 billion to $500 billion.

Bills for the raised debt ceiling were expected to come before the House this week, with Labor likely to try to amend the bills to allow only a $400 billion ceiling.

But Mr Palmer said he would not be participating in a vote on the bill when it came before the House.

EARLIER: CLIVE Palmer has launched a scathing attack on News Corporation and Rupert Murdoch in his first address as an MP to the National Press Club.

Mr Palmer called on journalists in Australia to lift their game, saying it was important that there was competition and diversity in the media.

He said journalists should ensure fact checking and credibility was central to their task.

Mr Palmer particularly targeted The Australian newspaper and its investigative journalist Hedley Thomas.

"You have to give Hedley something to do. He is after all national affairs editors of something or other,'' Mr Palmer said.

"Why have a go at us because people agree with us and they don't agree with the Courier-Mail,'' Mr Palmer told a reporter from the Courier-Mail.

He said the media had an important role in providing scrutiny of public officials and politicians.

But he said they should not be targeted or singled out by someone who is not even a citizen - a reference to Rupert  Murdoch, who is an American citizen.

Earlier, Clive Palmer has declared himself a "100% politician", amid questions about his dedication to representing his Sunshine Coast constituents in Canberra.

The businessman, hotelier and mine owner said on Tuesday morning he was "fully retired from business".

As the official opening of the 44th Parliament got underway in Canberra, Mr Palmer also said he hoped to use the balance of power in the Senate "correctly".

His comments follows reports on Tuesday that he had also strengthened his role when the new Senate is sworn-in, with West Australian Senator-elect Wayne Dropulich reportedly joining his voting bloc.

Amid questions about his business interests, Mr Palmer said he was a "100% politician - that's what I'm doing, nothing else".

But he would not commit to attending all parliamentary sittings, declaring he was "not going to commit to sit in a box and do nothing".

Mr Palmer also said the real story of the election was that "the economy is in a bad way", hitting out at Treasurer Joe Hockey's moves to raise the nation's debt ceiling from $300 billion to $500 billion.

Bills for the raised debt ceiling were expected to come before the House this week, with Labor likely to try to amend the bills to allow only a $400 billion ceiling.

But Mr Palmer said he would not be participating in the vote, declaring while he would talk about the issue in a National press Club address today, he would abstain on any vote in parliament.


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