BACK TO THE FUTURE: Pauline fronts the cameras

INFLUENTIAL: One Nation leader Pauline Hanson is set to have a majpr say when she takes her place in the Senate.
INFLUENTIAL: One Nation leader Pauline Hanson is set to have a majpr say when she takes her place in the Senate. Rob Williams

PAULINE Hanson has spoken to ABC News in an interview which made one feel just like they had taken a journey back to the 1990s. 

In a lengthy appearance the woman who now looks set to lead a group of senators down to Canberra said she was in favour of repealing Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, still holds fears for her personal safety and even claimed her One Nation Party boasts a Muslim membership.

"I am concerned about my safety, of course," Ms Hanson said.

"But sometimes you've got to stand up for what you believe in and you can't back down from it and that's why so many people feel the same, because they're in fear. 

"That's why I think maybe some of the other members of parliament have not taken a stance against this as well and I see the fear when I turn on my TV or see what's happening in the rest of the world. 

"Do you want fear to dictate a lifestyle ahead of us or for our future generations? I don't and that's why I think that sometimes someone has to take a stance."

However after questions about her calls for a Royal Commission into Islam Ms Hanson also made clear she would stand for more than just racial issues.

"I'm not just on about Islam and I will not back away from that but I think there are more important issues here and I'd like first a Royal Commission into the banking and finance sector," she said.  

"Again, we have families that are losing their family homes, their properties by the banking sector that I believe needs to full investigation into it because documentation that I have seen clearly shows that signatures have been forged."

On the Racial Discrimination Act Hanson pointed out that the Abbott Government had taken steps towards repealing it. 

"Even Senator George Brandis called for abolishing the Racial Discrimination Act and I believe that Tony Abbott would have liked to abolish it," she told the media. 

"18C of the Racial Discrimination Act and it does, if you find anything that's offensive or - and the other components of it.

"The thing is that we live in a democratic society.

"We are entitled to freedom of speech and freedom of expression.

"As long as it's not out to insight hatred or violence, so by having this, it is stifling people's right to have an opinion.

"I think we are mature enough in Australia that if anyone comes out and says anything that is offensive the general public will have their say as they have done."

Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act  states it is unlawful to publicly make statements which are: "likely, in all the circumstances, to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate another or a group of people.

"And the act is done because of the race, colour or national or ethnic origin of the other person or of some or all of the people in the group."

After saying she believes Islamic Schools preach hatred towards Australians Ms Hanson added some Muslims agreed with her views.

"When I was in Victoria, a fellow came up to me, a Muslim, his wife was running the shop. She said, "We're Muslims and you're right in what you're saying with it but I can't come out and say anything against them," she said.

Ms Hanson also fielded questions on whether or not she would deport Muslims. 

"You can't deport the Muslims that are here and, look, I've spoken to Muslims, I think I've got a couple of Muslims who are members of my party actually," she said.

"You have our values, our culture and our way of life, that's in Australia.  

"You don't have a full burqa, that's been proven in other countries around the world that have banned the burqa in Government areas, schools and educational places.  

"You don't keep putting up mosques and it's not me, it sour society that are on the streets protesting against the building of mosques. Why? Because they see the repercussions happening in their own communities and own areas."  

At one point her exchange with the media became a little heated when she was quizzed about her policy documents. 

JOURNALIST: One of your policy documents says that Islam has no place in Australia if we're to live  in a cohesive society.

HANSON: You love your Islam bit, don't you?

At present the AEC has counted over 1.5 million Queensland senate votes and on first preferences One Nation has just less than 134,000 votes, the LNP 492,684 and Labor 398,166. 

Topics:  back to the future editors picks racial discrimination act

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