Hedge your bets for a six-figure salary by pursuing a career in mining or technology.

While $100,000-plus careers are possible in every sector, exclusive analysis of SEEK job ads revealed 91 of 352 occupational groups averaged a pay packet of this size and they were dominated by these two sectors.

They included 14 mining, resources and energy jobs ranging from analysis and reporting ($101,929) through to management ($148,511), and 12 Information and Communication Technology (ICT) jobs ranging from network engineering ($100,919) through to management ($138,999) - as well as nine jobs in engineering, nine in banking and finance, eight in legal and seven in accounting.


There were also six healthcare and medical occupations, including the number one and two highest advertised salaries: general practitioners averaging $183,092 and medical specialists averaging $148,991.

SEEK employment analyst Leigh Broderick. Picture: Supplied
SEEK employment analyst Leigh Broderick. Picture: Supplied

SEEK employment analyst Leigh Broderick said the main factors influencing which jobs attracted the big bucks were level of specialisation and mismatch of supply and demand.

"More specialised skills or harder-to-get skills will attract higher salaries," he said.

"That's why surgeons will get paid more.

"Mining is a good example of (supply and demand) as there can be a huge surge in the need for different skills on remote sites and if there is no one out there to do it, to entice people out there, they have to increase the price."

Recruitment Consulting and Staffing Association (RCSA) chief executive Charles Cameron said the risk and profile associated with a role were also factors.

"The higher the risk that results from an error, the higher the salary that can be demanded - obvious examples are senior lawyers or senior surgeons or CEOs," he said.

"Meanwhile, if you want to work in industries that are high profile - media, entertainment, sports administration, even some tech firms - you are going to be competing against a larger supply of candidates.

"Although it looks great, it doesn't necessarily pay great."

The SEEK data revealed 11 sectors where it was particularly difficult to land a $100,000-plus pay packet.

There were no occupations averaging six figures within administration and office support; advertising, arts and media; call centre and customer service; community services and development; design and architecture; farming, animals and conservation; government and defence; hospitality and tourism; retail and consumer products; sport and recreation or trades and services.

CAREER CHANGE: FAST FOOD TO FINANCE

The pursuit of a higher salary was a major factor in hospitality worker Rachel Simpson's decision to make a career change.

After more than a decade working in fast food, the Marion mother of two enrolled in a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in accounting and Bachelor of Business majoring in financial planning through UniSA Online.

"I'm a single parent (children aged 6 and 5) so being able to change industry will hopefully mean an increase in salary," she said.

"Kids aren't cheap and I want to be able to provide them with everything they need."

The 32-year-old, who is managing part-time work and full-time study, is on track to graduate at the end of the year then start applying for roles in the finance sector.

"I could be a finance officer at a school or work for a big four firm or start my own business," she said.

"Business is everywhere - you can go into a whole range of things."

 

BDO’s Peter McKenzie switched from the catering department to the IT department. Picture: Supplied
BDO’s Peter McKenzie switched from the catering department to the IT department. Picture: Supplied

 

CAREER CHANGE: COFFEE TO COMPUTERS

For Peter McKenzie, 24, a pay increase was just a bonus in his career change from hospitality to IT last year.

The Hurstville Grove resident had been working as a catering assistant at accounting firm BDO when the COVID-19 outbreak hit and his future did not look so bright.

"I've been good mates with the IT team since I started at BDO, playing video games in my free time with a lot of them and having long chats relating to technology when we were in the office," he said.

"Through my internal network, I was asked to assist the IT service desk team who had seen a growing demand for their services as everyone shifted to work from home.

"(Working in IT) has been a dream for some time as I've always had an enthusiasm and passion for technology and the culture surrounding it, but I never thought I'd be able to get a chance to pursue it.

"(The pay increase) was also a reason why I was keen to move into the field as there is more career progression within the IT industry in contrast to hospitality."

CDAA’s Linda Jeffrey said the first step in a career change was self reflection. Picture: Supplied
CDAA’s Linda Jeffrey said the first step in a career change was self reflection. Picture: Supplied

HOW TO MAKE A CAREER CHANGE

SOURCE: Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) national vice president Linda Jeffrey

REFLECT

* Ask yourself: Why do you want to make a change? Would you be happy in the same type of role but with an employer whose values are more in line with your own? What aspects of previous jobs have you valued or disliked?

* Know your goal and what will give you job satisfaction - for example, money, prestige, better work-life balance, more challenge, more control?

* Know what you need from the new role - for example, a particular location, level of stability?

RESEARCH

* Review the types of jobs and industries you want to pursue by searching organisational

websites, LinkedIn, social media and industry associations.

* Review current job advertisements and consider what skills/experience employers want.

* Review current labour market information - visit lmip.gov.au for employment projections,

industry information and regional employment data.

IDENTIFY GAPS

* Determine what you need to learn to become employable in this field and who is offering accredited training to enable you to upskill?

* If you are starting your own business, do you have business management skills?

PREPARE YOUR APPLICATION

* Understand current recruitment practices.

* Update your resume and LinkedIn profile.

* Consider your network and who can help you to progress.

MAKE A PLAN

* This should be flexible so you can adapt to changing circumstances.

* Include all factors, such as time to pay for and complete required training.

* Set small progress goals to break the process into manageable steps.

 

 

 

Originally published as Australia's top 20 highest and lowest paying jobs

Rachel Simpson is upskilling through UniSA Online to make a career change. Picture: Supplied
Rachel Simpson is upskilling through UniSA Online to make a career change. Picture: Supplied

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