CLOT BUSTERS: Toogoolawah advanced care paramedics Michael Bishop and Ian Pyper are looking forward to utilising a new clot-busting treatment for heart attack victims.
CLOT BUSTERS: Toogoolawah advanced care paramedics Michael Bishop and Ian Pyper are looking forward to utilising a new clot-busting treatment for heart attack victims. Tom Threadingham

Toogoolawah ambos undertake life-saving training

TOOGOOLAWAH paramedics will soon be equipped with further lifesaving skills on the front-line.

The station was the first within the West Moreton LASN (local ambulance service network) to begin specialised thrombolysis training last week.

The clot-busting treatment will add to the already skilled repertoire of the Toogoolawah paramedics and significantly help to improve the health of heart attack victims.

Toogoolawah Ambulance Station officer in charge Shane Sypher said the training was vital to help heart attack patients due to the station's proximity to major hospitals.

"It's being rolled out at other country stations but we were the first cab off the rank in the West Moreton LASN," Mr Sypher said.

"Toogoolawah is beyond the 60-minute barrier and beyond a lot of major hospitals and this is a very safe practice we do. If they don't meet the parameters we don't do it.

Mr Sypher said the new treatment was a decision-supported program with use of the drugs having to be approved by a critical care paramedic.

"A snap shot of the ECG is emailed or SMS to the consult line and two heads are better than one, basically," he said.

"If the blood clot in the heart fits all the parameters then we'll go through the procedure and administer certain clot-busting drugs which should alleviate pain and then the prognosis for the patient is on the way up from there," he said.

"It's good for us here if we get someone who fits the parameters because it then helps start dissolving the blood clot.

Mr Sypher said the training would be completed in four weeks.

"The paramedics at the station save lives already but this is a huge step for the community and we are really happy with that."

West Moreton Local Ambulance Service Network chief superintendent Drew Hebbron said it was a great benefit to the station.

"They are quite high level drugs they are getting access to," Mr Hebbron said.

"What it means is that they can administer the drugs in certain situations and dissolve the clots in the field and then transport the patient to hospital."


Jetstar drops incredible $65 return sale

Jetstar drops incredible $65 return sale

Jetstar has just launched their “Return for Free” domestic flight sale, with some...

REVEALED: How Lockyer plans to be part of QLD Olympics

Premium Content REVEALED: How Lockyer plans to be part of QLD Olympics

It’s been revealed what role the Lockyer Valley would hope to gain if Brisbane...

Property boom: The suburbs reaching staggering prices

Premium Content Property boom: The suburbs reaching staggering prices

Is your suburb on the list of crazy sales?