Whales can caused major damage to yachts if not avoided.
Whales can caused major damage to yachts if not avoided.

It's whale season and the new flock is here

WE'VE all heard of people whale-watching, but now it seems the whales are just as interested in watching us.

These amazing images, captured by Rainbow Bay photographer Kellie Wilson, show a pod of four whales playing in the shallow water at Coolangatta on Sunday.

And witnesses believe they came so close because they wanted to get a good look at the surfers in the water.

"It was crazy to have see them so close just at the beach, they were there for a good half an hour," Ms Wilson said.

"I have seen a few before, they were very interested in the surfers.

"They (surfers) were keeping their distance but the whales did want a good look."

The pod of frolicking whales photographed by Kellie Wilson. Photo: Kellie Wilson.
The pod of frolicking whales photographed by Kellie Wilson. Photo: Kellie Wilson.


Anthony Ardern from Whales in Paradise said whales can sometimes be more curious than people.

"Whales are very curious and inquisitive," Mr Ardern said.

"It is actually really the colour, they love watching the different colours move around the boat. "Their eyes are about the size of grapefruit."

The experienced whale watch guide said sightings this close to shore are becoming more common.

"There are heaps and heaps of calves out there at the moment, some are only days old," he said.

"Whale numbers are up from 14000 when we started to 30000, so we are seeing them more.

"They come into the shore and rest, especially in and around Currumbin and Tallebudgera Creek."

The pod of four whales spotted at Rainbow Bay Sunday. Photos: Kellie Wilson
The pod of four whales spotted at Rainbow Bay Sunday. Photos: Kellie Wilson

The spring-like weather is also likely to bring Gold Coast locals out to play, with temperatures across the Gold Coast set to soar to the 27 and 28 degree mark by the end of the week.

It might not be record high temperatures for August, but it'll be a welcome change to the crisp mornings.

Yesterday and today, at the Seaway, morning temperatures dipped to a chilly seven degrees - five degrees below the monthly average, while daytime temperatures were in the high teens to low 20s.

A pod of four whales spotted at Rainbow Bay Sunday. Photos: Kellie Wilson
A pod of four whales spotted at Rainbow Bay Sunday. Photos: Kellie Wilson

Weatherzone Meteorologist Kim Westcott said a pool of cold air from "way down south" was moving through the Eastern states.

"It definitely takes your breath away," she said.

"It could be cold tomorrow (Wednesday) morning as well. We'll see light wind, cold mornings, but beautiful days. It's the cherry on top when it comes to living on the Gold Coast, lots of sunshine."

 

Spectators watched the whales enjoy themselves at Rainbow Bay near Coolangatta. Photos: Kellie Wilson
Spectators watched the whales enjoy themselves at Rainbow Bay near Coolangatta. Photos: Kellie Wilson

 

The average temperature for August is 22. Last year we enjoyed a 29 degree day, and Ms Westcott said it wasn't uncommon for the mercury to spike around 27 or 29 degrees in August.

"It's hard to say at this stage looking forward into the crystal ball what the rest of the month will bring. But there may be a few cooler morning in there the rest of the month," she said.
"There doesn't seem to be any strong indications of big drenchings of rain at this stage.
"As far as warmer conditions go, the days will be beautiful. Maybe some warmer ones towards next weekend - it's just too early to say exactly how warm."


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