SOLDIERS MARCHED DEFIANTLY through Gatton during the parade down Railway Street on their way to the Weeping Mothers Memorial. Services were held throughout the Lockyer and Brisbane valleys on Monday with thousands of residents taking the time to attend one of the ceremonies. PHOTO: Loren Jarvis Photography
SOLDIERS MARCHED DEFIANTLY through Gatton during the parade down Railway Street on their way to the Weeping Mothers Memorial. Services were held throughout the Lockyer and Brisbane valleys on Monday with thousands of residents taking the time to attend one of the ceremonies. PHOTO: Loren Jarvis Photography

A time to remember

SACRIFICE, endurance, courage and mateship are just some of the words echoed around cenotaphs and Anzac Day services throughout the Lockyer and Brisbane Valley on Monday

The words resonate within each generation, young and old, as people take time out from their busy lives to reflect on the actions of their relatives who once went to war to defend their country. Fidelity is the spirit of the Anzac troops scaling beaches and cliffs in Gallipoli, and fighting in the harsh desert conditions of Libya and treacherous jungles of Papua New Guinea.

Not to mention those who fought at sea, in the air and on the ground at the forefront of battle.

A strong crowd turned out to the Laidley service, following a colourful parade in Patrick Street.

A man with a weathered Akubra hat salutes the catafalque as The Last Post is played.

His head then drops solemnly for the minute silence and he courteously removes his hat for the national anthem, but his body is tout and cheerful again for the rouse.

Alex Blaw of Plainland said the day was a time to reflect and respect the troops that are still serving around the world.

He was joined by friend Tim Stapleford visiting from Jimboomba.

“My uncle was killed on the Western Front in Belgium during World War One,” he said.

Mr Blaw wore the medals of his father who also fought in the Great War and won the military medal for bravery.

“By the time I joined they were offering good money in the army and I was in the 2/14th Light Horse but they found out I was under age in Papua New Guinea,” he said.

“They sent me back to Australia but after two weeks I was old enough and went back.

“Most of the boys on the Kokoda track weren't trained to fire a gun properly.”

Mr Blaw said the emblem of his battalion was an emu with the word “forward” underneath for the coat of arms that symbolised always marching onward to victory.

“The kangaroo and emu are animals featured on our coins because they cannot step backward, only forward,” he said.

As the sun sets on April 25, farewells are made to old mates as medals are returned to their cupboard for another year, until they are polished off again next Anzac Day.


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